Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Intermediate Italian I

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Italian I

Course presents a systematic introduction to a variety of complex cultural and historical topics related to present-day Italy, emphasizing intercultural comparisons and interdisciplinarity, and encouraging a personal exploration of such topics. Course adopts a continuous assessment system (no mid-term and no final), and is conducted entirely in Italian. Year course; must complete both semesters for credit. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option. Language Program Director: Alessandro Zannirato

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Made in Italy: Italian style in context

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Accelerated Italian Elements I for Advanced Spanish Speakers

Course draws on the many similarities between Spanish and Italian to help students develop basic listening, reading, writing, speaking, and interactional skills in Italian in an accelerated fashion. The content of the course is highly communicative, and students are constantly presented with real-life, task-based activities. Course is taught in Spanish and Italian. Students completing both semesters with a grade of A- or higher will be able to place into Advanced Italian I (AS.210.351)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 12/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Literature

As surprising as it might be, Northern and Southern Italy did not unify until 1861. Following the unification, the veil of mystery that cloaked southern Italy was lifted, and many Northern Italians were shocked to see the cultural, social, and economic differences between north and south. This course will cover the modern classics of the early 20th century (Pirandello, Moravia, Primo Levi) and their response to the spread of fascism during WWI and WWII. The course will explore topics such as feminist literature, Southern migration to the US, national identity, and gender. We will journey from the centers of modern Italy (Milan, Rome) to the “ancient” capitals of Southern Italy (Palermo, Naples), from Italy’s “golden years” of the 1950s to contemporary authors who focus on present-day Southern Italy (Erri De Luca and Elena Ferrante). The course is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental Crises

Over the past decade, growing numbers of filmmakers in Italy have addressed ecological crises in their work. This class takes an eco-critical approach to contemporary Italian cinema, examining a body of compelling place-centered stories that deal with local and global issues. Defining the scope of eco-cinema and the ways we can interrogate films as ecological texts, we shall screen earth-centered films that raise consciousness about the consequences of human manipulation of the natural world; the complicity of industry, government, and organized crime in creating environmental crises; and the effects of economic and social malaise. Screenings include iconic films such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Red Desert (1963), more recent, critically acclaimed films such as Matteo Garrone’s Gomorrah (2008), Alice Rohrwacher’s Happy as Lazzaro (2018), and many others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Literature

As surprising as it might be, Northern and Southern Italy did not unify until 1861. Following the unification, the veil of mystery that cloaked southern Italy was lifted, and many Northern Italians were shocked to see the cultural, social, and economic differences between north and south. This course will cover the modern classics of the early 20th century (Pirandello, Moravia, Primo Levi) and their response to the spread of fascism during WWI and WWII. The course will explore topics such as feminist literature, Southern migration to the US, national identity, and gender. We will journey from the centers of modern Italy (Milan, Rome) to the “ancient” capitals of Southern Italy (Palermo, Naples), from Italy’s “golden years” of the 1950s to contemporary authors who focus on present-day Southern Italy (Erri De Luca and Elena Ferrante). The course is taught in English.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Intermediate Italian I

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/13
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/6
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.251 (02)Intermediate Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroShriver Hall Board Room
AS.210.351 (01)Advanced Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroGilman 443
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMProietti, LeonardoShriver Hall 104GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.210.151 (01)Italian Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroKrieger 304
AS.210.151 (03)Italian Elements IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMProietti, Leonardo, StaffGilman 443
AS.210.151 (02)Italian Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMProietti, Leonardo, StaffMaryland 104
AS.210.171 (01)Accelerated Italian Elements I for Advanced Spanish SpeakersMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZannirato, AlessandroShriver Hall 001
AS.214.363 (01)Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary LiteratureTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 217GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.327 (01)Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental CrisesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 277ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.214.363 (02)Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary LiteratureTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 217GRLL-ENGL
AS.210.251 (01)Intermediate Italian IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroGilman 479
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.214.479 (02)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800