Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. Both semesters must be completed with passing grades to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking World

Taught in German. Topically, this course focuses on defining moments in cultural history in German speaking countries in the 2nd half of the 20th century. Films, texts and other media provide a basis for discussing events in post-war Germany from 1945 to 1989. A review and expansion of advanced grammatical concepts and vocabulary underlies the course. Focus on improving expression in writing and speaking. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking World

Taught in German. Topically, this course focuses on defining moments in cultural history in German speaking countries in the 2nd half of the 20th century. Films, texts and other media provide a basis for discussing events in post-war Germany from 1945 to 1989. A review and expansion of advanced grammatical concepts and vocabulary underlies the course. Focus on improving expression in writing and speaking. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. Both semesters must be completed with passing grades to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. Both semesters must be completed with passing grades to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Panorama of German Thought

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from Kant to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to discovering their unity as “German” philosophical and cultural artifacts and icons, as well as with an interest in establishing their well-deserved place in the wider, global discourses of world literature. In this way, we will learn to think critically in and with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Among authors read and discussed will be Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

German Conversation

This course is designed for intermediate and above students who wish to improve their conversational and oral presentational language skills. The syllabus aims to provide useful, relevant language and necessary discourse structures to hold conversations and presentations on varied topics of an everyday, as well as academic nature. Students will practice German to build confidence, develop fluency, and improve pronunciation and accuracy. Short texts, audio and films will provide the basis for discussion. Students’ fields of study and interests will be incorporated into the syllabus and tasks will be matched to the ability level of the students enrolled. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.262 or two years of college German or equivalent. May be taken concurrently with other courses in German. May be taken Pass/Fail. Not for major or minor credit.

  • Credits: 1.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Outsiders, outlaws, outcasts

This course offers an introduction to the close reading of German-language literature in the original. Discussing literary works that portray subjects in the grip of experiential crises, we will examine the ways in which literature can represent breakdowns in established forms of sense-making and the emergence of novel forms of selfhood. Attention will be paid to writers’ divergent responses to the challenges of modernity, including the French Revolution and its aftermath, the decline of religious authority, the rise of mercantile capitalism and the natural-scientific worldview, and the transformation of humans' relations with nature. Taught in German.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM

Berlin Between the Wars: Literature, Art, Music, Film

Explore the diverse culture of Berlin during the heyday of modernism. During the Weimar Republic, Berlin became a center for theater, visual arts, film, music, and literature that would have an outsize impact on culture throughout the world and the twentieth century. The thinkers, artists, and writers drawn to interwar Berlin produced a body of work that encapsulates many of the issues of the period: the effect of the modern city on society; “the New Woman”; socialist revolutionary politics; the rise of the Nazis; and economic turmoil. While learning about interwar Berlin's cultural diversity, we will take a special look at works by Jewish writers and artists that engage with the question of ethnic, religious, and national identity in the modern world, specifically in the context of Berlin’s rich Jewish history and the rise of anti-Semitism in the interwar period. All readings will be in translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-GLOBAL

Sex und Macht

We will discuss postwar and contemporary literature and films that grapple with the effect of unequal power structures on sexual relations. Taught in German.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy

This course explores the themes of existentialism, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, freedom and responsibility to others, in literary and philosophical works. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression, or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus, among others. Course will be taught by the Kurrelmeyer Chair in German. Taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.161 (01)German Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffGilman 186
AS.210.361 (01)Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking WorldMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffHodson 313
AS.210.361 (02)Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking WorldMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffGilman 134
AS.210.261 (01)Intermediate German IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff, Wheeler, Heidi LHodson 315
AS.210.161 (02)German Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffGilman 277
AS.210.261 (03)Intermediate German IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMStaff, Wheeler, Heidi LHodson 315
AS.210.261 (02)Intermediate German IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff, Wheeler, Heidi LHodson 315
AS.210.161 (03)German Elements IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, T 12:00PM - 12:50PMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffGilman 186
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDornbach, MartonGilman 75GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.210.266 (01)German ConversationT 12:00PM - 1:15PMMifflin, Deborah McGee, StaffGilman 443
AS.213.205 (01)Outsiders, outlaws, outcastsWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMDornbach, MartonGilman 134GRLL-GERM
AS.211.328 (01)Berlin Between the Wars: Literature, Art, Music, FilmW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel JacobBloomberg 172GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.213.373 (01)Sex und MachtTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPahl, KatrinGilman 381
AS.213.374 (01)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 277GRLL-ENGL