Graduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the SIS website.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Independent Study-German

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Humanity in Question

Although it is often assumed that any inquiry into the human inevitably leads to pernicious forms of anthropocentrism, current debates about the Anthropocene suggest that we avoid such reflection at our own peril. Drawing on philosophy, biology, and sociology, Helmuth Plessner's Levels of Organic Life and the Human: An Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology (1928) offers a powerful account of humans' "excentric positionality," whose key ideas Plessner would further flesh out in his Political Anthropology (1931). Plessner's 1928 book was overshadowed, however, by the near-simultaneous appearance of Being and Time and Heidegger's imperious dismissals of philosophical anthropology. Disturbed by Heidegger's blindspot and its political consequences, during the World War II Hans Jonas, one of Heidegger's most original students, began to outline a conception of organic life as “an experiment with mounting stakes,” with the highest stakes reached in human freedom. That conception, fully elaborated in The Phenomenon of Life: Toward a Philosophical Biology (1966), would serve as the basis for Jonas's influential theory of bioethical and ecological responsibility. Now that Plessner's key works are finally available in English translation, a joint examination of his, Heidegger's, and Jonas's conceptions is in order. We will ask what these three thinkers have to tell us about our current situation.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading and Translating German for Academic Purposes

Taught in English. This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for graduate students in other fields who wish to gain a reading knowledge of the German language. Seniors who intend to do graduate study in other disciplines are also welcome, with permission from instructor. Instruction includes an introduction to German vocabulary and grammatical structures as well as discussion of relevant translation practices. The goal of the course is for students to gain confidence in reading a variety of texts, including those in their own fields of study. No knowledge of German is assumed. Seniors by permission & Graduate students only.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study-German

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Imagination in Philosophy and Literary Theory

Imagination in Philosophy and Literary Theory is devoted to studying theories of imagination in the history of philosophy and literary theory, from the ancient Greeks to the present day. We will study philosophical conceptions of the role of imagination in memory, cognition, perception, and creativity, and assess traditional philosophical oppositions between imagination and reason, the imaginary and the real. Readings may include selections from Aristotle, Kant, Coleridge, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Dufrenne, Stevens, Iser, Ricoeur, Ryle, Wittgenstein, and Nussbaum.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Directed Dissertation Research

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Meanings of "German-Jewish"

From the middle ages to the present day, Jews have spoken German, been part of whatever it has meant to be German, and produced German culture. Yet this thousand-year history was repeatedly marred by persecution, murder, and expulsion, including the Holocaust. This course aims to survey the culture (primarily literature, but including music, visual art, and film) that resulted from this complicated history, focusing on the period from the 18th century to the present. We will look at highlights of German culture, from the philosophy of Moses Mendelssohn to the music of his grandson Felix, from the novels of Franz Kafka to the films of Hollywood director Ernst Lubitsch and beyond. We will examine the complicated ways identity is formed and shaped and the aesthetic and social consequences of the ways it has been contested. What it has meant to be German will be as much a subject of this course as what it has meant to be Jewish. All texts in translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Directed Dissertation Research

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study-German

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

On the Difficulty of Saying I

This course takes as its point of departure the position that language carries within it the traces of something that exceeds the cognitive grasp of the subject and to this extent undoes any claim to knowledge the subject might make. This position has been central to twentieth and twenty-first century thought from psychoanalysis and poststructuralism to media theory and new materialism. This course will not take issue with this position. It will examine instead how this position evolved from the Idealism of Fichte to the eerily inhuman, if not mechanical, talking figures in texts by Novalis (“Monolog”), Poe (“Maelzel’s Chess Player”), Hoffmann (“Die Automate”), Büchner (Leonce und Lena), and Kafka (“Ein Bericht für eine Akademie”). We will explore the literature of the personal and impersonal in romantic and modernist texts in order to ask what moves and motivates works in which the first-person narrator would seem to be nothing more than a fiction—a staged phenomenon or a mechanical device.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM

Directed Dissertation Research

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Directed Dissertation Research

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Qualifying Paper Preparation

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Qualifying Paper Preparation

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Qualifying Paper Preparation

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Qualifying Paper Preparation

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.213.800 (01)Independent Study-GermanGosetti, Jennifer Anna 
AS.211.727 (01)Humanity in QuestionM 5:00PM - 7:00PMDornbach, MartonGilman 479
AS.210.661 (01)Reading and Translating German for Academic PurposesMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMWheeler, Heidi LGilman 479
AS.213.800 (02)Independent Study-GermanTobias, Rochelle 
AS.213.687 (01)Imagination in Philosophy and Literary TheoryT 3:00PM - 5:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 479
AS.213.812 (02)Directed Dissertation ResearchTobias, Rochelle 
AS.211.352 (01)The Meanings of "German-Jewish"MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSpinner, Samuel Jacob INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.213.812 (01)Directed Dissertation ResearchGosetti, Jennifer Anna 
AS.213.800 (04)Independent Study-GermanSpinner, Samuel Jacob 
AS.213.639 (01)On the Difficulty of Saying IF 4:00PM - 6:00PMTobias, RochelleGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM
AS.213.812 (03)Directed Dissertation ResearchPahl, Katrin 
AS.213.812 (04)Directed Dissertation ResearchSpinner, Samuel Jacob 
AS.213.813 (03)German Qualifying Paper PreparationPahl, Katrin 
AS.213.813 (04)German Qualifying Paper PreparationSpinner, Samuel Jacob 
AS.213.813 (01)German Qualifying Paper PreparationGosetti, Jennifer Anna 
AS.213.813 (02)German Qualifying Paper PreparationTobias, Rochelle