Undergraduate Courses

For current offerings, please see the department’s listings on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Undergraduate coursework in French falls under two main areas that each provide necessary training for the major and minor in French.

  • The sequence in French Language (210 prefix) aims to bring students to advanced proficiency in reading, writing, understanding, and speaking French as well as an awareness of the history and sociology of the French language.
    • Students acquire fundamentals of spoken exchange and written composition and become familiar with the various registers of French, from streetwise slang to the highly codified discourses used in international relations, science, or medicine, among others.
    • The sequence culminates in the capstone course Eloquent French, required of French majors and minors.
    • Also featured are themed courses on the presence of French around the globe and on the sounds of the French language.
  • Courses in French Literary and Cultural Studies (212 prefix) focus on the interpretation and analysis of texts from a rich variety of genres and modes of writing in French (e.g., the novel, poetry, short fiction, autobiography, the essay, memoirs, digital writing).
    • Coursework in literary studies introduces students to techniques of close reading (explication de texte), linguistic analysis, historical and cultural contextualization, and theoretical questions about the nature, purposes, and history of literature and its institutions.
    • Courses in cultural studies push students to engage critically with a wide range of documents past and present, from speeches and illustrations to films, news clips, and current events, and to develop sensitivity to social and historical context. These courses present techniques for situated analysis in a French and Francophone context.
  • On occasion the French section offers special topics courses taught in English (211 prefix). These courses are also open to students with limited or no prior exposure to French.

Motivated students are encouraged to pursue study of another Romance language or of German. Students majoring in French who are interested in the Renaissance or Middle Ages are advised to acquire reading knowledge of Latin.

Majors and minors are encouraged to spend a semester at one of the JHU-approved study abroad programs, preferably during the spring of the junior year, both to perfect their command of the French language and to gain exposure to the methods and culture of research in the higher education system in the French-speaking world.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Learner Managed French Elements I

This beginner course is specifically designed for students who have had some exposure to French. They must take the mandatory placement test: http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php, and receive between 30 and 49. They will cover the first semester of French Elements at a pace suited for "false beginners" with major online components to supplement class instruction. Must complete the year with 210.102 or 210.104 to obtain credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 (or below 200 on Webcape). Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 (or below 200 on Webcape). Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 (or below 200 on Webcape). Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French I: Achieving Accuracy

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French I: Achieving Accuracy

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French II: Reaching Fluency

Students in 210.302 will focus primarily on oral expression through individual and group work on contemporary media (music, film, current events) in order to expand their vocabulary and become fluent in conversation across social-cultural contexts. (A primary focus on written expression is provided in 210.301; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Le monde francophone

This course examines both sociolinguistic and cultural aspects of the French-speaking world and the relationship between la francophonie and France itself. We focus on five regions—Sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroun and Senegal), Northern Africa (Morocco and Algeria), the Caribbean (Martinique and Haiti), North America (Quebec), and Europe (Belgium)—and consider language features unique to those regional varieties, the status of French as opposed to other indigenous languages and creoles, the demographics of their speakers, and the representation of their culture in media (particularly in short stories, poetry, song, and film). A semester-long research project on one of these main areas will allow students to combine their study of the French-speaking world with other disciplines of interest to them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French I: Achieving Accuracy

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French II: Reaching Fluency

Students in 210.302 will focus primarily on oral expression through individual and group work on contemporary media (music, film, current events) in order to expand their vocabulary and become fluent in conversation across social-cultural contexts. (A primary focus on written expression is provided in 210.301; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French II: Reaching Fluency

Students in 210.302 will focus primarily on oral expression through individual and group work on contemporary media (music, film, current events) in order to expand their vocabulary and become fluent in conversation across social-cultural contexts. (A primary focus on written expression is provided in 210.301; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Eloquent French

This interactive, writing intensive course has a double agenda: 1) to guide students towards linguistic proficiency in French by exposing them to an extended range of stylistic, idiomatic and grammatical expressions; 2) to strengthen students' individual voices in written and oral expression. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 and AS.210.302.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Eloquent French

This interactive, writing intensive course has a double agenda: 1) to guide students towards linguistic proficiency in French by exposing them to an extended range of stylistic, idiomatic and grammatical expressions; 2) to strengthen students' individual voices in written and oral expression. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 and AS.210.302.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Holocaust in Film and Literature

How has the Holocaust been represented in literature and film? Are there special challenges posed by genocide to the traditions of visual and literary representation? Where does the Holocaust fit in to the array of concerns that the visual arts and literature express? And where do art and literature fit in to the commemoration of communal tragedy and the working through of individual trauma entailed by thinking about and representing the Holocaust? These questions will guide our consideration of a range of texts — nonfiction, novels, poetry — in Yiddish, German, English, French and other languages (including works by Primo Levi and Isaac Bashevis Singer), as well as films from French documentaries to Hollywood blockbusters (including films by Alain Resnais, Claude Lanzmann, and Steven Spielberg). All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction à la littérature française

Introduction à la Littérature française I and II propose reading and discussion of texts of various genres from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. This sequence is intended as an introduction to the methods, questions, and techniques of textual analysis through intensive reading, discussion, and production of written texts. Introduction à la littérature française I covers some of the greatest classics of French literature and thought from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. The two semesters may be taken in either order. This sequence is a pre-requisite to all further literature courses. Students may co-register with an upper-level course during their second semester. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301-AS.210.302 or at least one semester of AS.210.301-AS.210.302 with a grade of A and written permission of the instructor. For more info see https://grll.jhu.edu/french/undergraduate/courses/

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The French Education System: Culture, Class, Race, and Religion in School

This course is an overview of the French education system and questions of race, religion, social class, and culture as they relate to public schools. We will study a variety of art forms including film, music, and literature to analyze the relationship between art, public discourse, and education policy. Students wishing to take the class for French major or minor credit should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN

La France Contemporaine

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

The French Education System: Culture, Class, Race, and Religion in School

This course is an overview of the French education system and questions of race, religion, social class, and culture as they relate to public schools. We will study a variety of art forms including film, music, and literature to analyze the relationship between art, public discourse, and education policy. Students wishing to take the class for French major or minor credit should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN

For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern France

Across the 20th century, mainstream and avant-garde French culture was deeply impacted by the presence of African American musicians and performing artists hailing from the jazz tradition. From the Josephine Baker craze of the 1920s to the second post-war which welcomed the innovations of bebop and sixties-era free improvisation, metropolitan France proved a space where expatriate and exiled African Americans could both perpetuate the tradition and innovate by turns. At the same time, French taste-makers, critics, and musicians eager to adopt new forms and styles debated the extent to which American jazz music in its various strains could be made French. This course in transcultural French studies will feature readings in music criticism, history, and literature, as well as frequent close listening. It will culminate in an international symposium (to be held Nov. 15 and 16; attendance mandatory) uniting noted scholars and legendary jazz musicians. Although some background in French language and basic musical notation is desirable (students are encouraged to engage in original-source research), all core course readings will be provided in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

The Count of Monte Cristo and its Avatars

Alexandre Dumas’s Le Comte de Monte Cristo (1844-46) is widely regarded as one of the most popular novels of all time and as one of the best adventure novels ever written. Perhaps no other masterpiece of French literature has been subjected around the world to such countless film adaptations, including animation, television series, and serials. This course aims to study and contextualize the reasons behind this sustained transnational and transcultural interest. Close reading and analysis of Dumas' novel will provide a good point of departure to explore problems that cut across nineteenth-century French society: politics, social class, revolution, family, love and desire, revenge, justice, science, and religion. Course conducted in French; most films in English or with English subtitles.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-FREN

Honors Thesis Prep

This course will meet three times during the Fall semester to enable all French majors to prepare their thesis subject, thesis bibliography, and abstract prior to the writing of the Senior Thesis (AS.212.430) in the Spring semester of their senior year. This course is required of all French majors and must be taken during the Fall semester of their senior year. Schedule TBA upon consultation with the class list, as there are only three group meetings. The rest of the meetings are in individual appointments with the DUS or another chosen French professor. Prerequisites: AS.212.333-334 and either prior enrollment or concurrent enrollment in AS.210.417 Eloquent French

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French I: Achieving Accuracy

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction à la littérature française

Introduction à la Littérature française I and II propose reading and discussion of texts of various genres from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. This sequence is intended as an introduction to the methods, questions, and techniques of textual analysis through intensive reading, discussion, and production of written texts. Introduction à la littérature française I covers some of the greatest classics of French literature and thought from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. The two semesters may be taken in either order. This sequence is a pre-requisite to all further literature courses. Students may co-register with an upper-level course during their second semester. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301-AS.210.302 or at least one semester of AS.210.301-AS.210.302 with a grade of A and written permission of the instructor. For more info see https://grll.jhu.edu/french/undergraduate/courses/

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Topics in French Cinema: Immigration, identité, différence culturelle

An exploration of immigration, identity, and cultural differences through the lens of recent French and Francophone films. Focus on discussion and analyses of film sequences in class and on oral presentations. Students will have the opportunity to progress in vocabulary, oral expression, and in critical analysis. Films studied include works of Kassowitz, the Dardennes, Kechiche, Sciamma, Haneke, and Audiard. Conducted in French. Recommended course background: completion of AS. 210.301 or equivalent score on Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 29/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.103 (01)Learner Managed French Elements ITTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAnderson, BruceHodson 315
AS.210.201 (01)Intermediate French IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMRoos, SuzanneKrieger 300
AS.210.201 (02)Intermediate French IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRoos, SuzanneKrieger 180
AS.210.201 (03)Intermediate French IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRoos, SuzanneKrieger 306
AS.210.201 (05)Intermediate French IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMRoos, SuzanneHodson 216
AS.210.201 (06)Intermediate French IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMRoos, SuzanneGilman 217
AS.210.101 (03)French Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, T 4:30PM - 5:45PMGuillemard, Claude HHodson 315
AS.210.101 (01)French Elements IMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 4:30PM - 5:45PMGuillemard, Claude HHodson 315
AS.210.101 (02)French Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, T 4:30PM - 5:45PMGuillemard, Claude HHodson 315
AS.210.301 (01)Advanced French I: Achieving AccuracyMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMTribotte, JulienShriver Hall 104
AS.210.201 (04)Intermediate French IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMRoos, SuzanneKrieger 302
AS.210.301 (02)Advanced French I: Achieving AccuracyMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMTribotte, JulienMattin Center 161
AS.210.302 (01)Advanced French II: Reaching FluencyMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff, Wuensch, AprilKrieger Laverty
AS.210.409 (01)Le monde francophoneTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAnderson, Bruce, StaffGilman 217
AS.210.301 (04)Advanced French I: Achieving AccuracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAnderson, BruceGilman 217
AS.210.302 (02)Advanced French II: Reaching FluencyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWuensch, AprilMattin Center 161
AS.210.302 (03)Advanced French II: Reaching FluencyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWuensch, AprilGilman 443
AS.210.417 (02)Eloquent FrenchMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMCook-Gailloud, KristinGilman 479
AS.210.417 (01)Eloquent FrenchMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCook-Gailloud, KristinGilman 479
AS.211.333 (01)The Holocaust in Film and LiteratureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel Jacob INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.333 (01)Introduction à la littérature françaiseTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAnderson, WildaGilman 134
AS.212.363 (02)The French Education System: Culture, Class, Race, and Religion in SchoolTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, F 1:00PM - 2:00PMBulakites, Eric RSmokler Center LibraryGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff, Wuensch, AprilGilman 400INST-CP
AS.212.363 (01)The French Education System: Culture, Class, Race, and Religion in SchoolTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBulakites, Eric RSmokler Center LibraryGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN
AS.212.413 (01)For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern FranceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchilling, DerekGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.402 (01)The Count of Monte Cristo and its AvatarsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDesormeaux, DanielGilman 482GRLL-FREN
AS.212.429 (01)Honors Thesis PrepT 6:30PM - 7:30PMAnderson, Wilda, Russo, Elena, Schilling, Derek, StaffGilman 418
AS.210.301 (03)Advanced French I: Achieving AccuracyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGilman 443
AS.212.430 (04)French Honors ThesisSchilling, Derek 
AS.212.333 (02)Introduction à la littérature françaiseMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRusso, ElenaGilman 381
AS.212.340 (01)Topics in French Cinema: Immigration, identité, différence culturelleMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoos, SuzanneKrieger Laverty
AS.212.430 (02)French Honors ThesisAnderson, Wilda 
AS.212.430 (03)French Honors ThesisRusso, Elena