Courses

If you would like to see our current offerings, please see the department’s listing on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.
A Guide to Courses in German and Romance Languages and Literatures

  • 100–599 courses are undergraduate level; 600–899 are graduate level
  • Courses with the prefix 210 are language courses
  • Courses with the prefix 211 are culture/civilization courses
  • Courses with the prefixes 212, 213, 214, and 215 are literature courses
  • Courses with the prefix 360 are interdepartmental courses
  • Graduate-level courses do not carry credit.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Accelerated Italian Elements I for Advanced Spanish Speakers

Course draws on the many similarities between Spanish and Italian to help students develop basic listening, reading, writing, speaking, and interactional skills in Italian in an accelerated fashion. The content of the course is highly communicative, and students are constantly presented with real-life, task-based activities. Course is taught in Spanish and Italian. Students completing both semesters with a grade of A- or higher will be able to place into Advanced Italian I (AS.210.351)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Topics in French Cinema: Amour, Sexualité, Mariage

What is the nature of desire? Where does it come from, and what determines and conditions it? What do we fall in love with when we fall in love? An exploration of a series of films that ask essential questions about the psychological, political, and social stakes of human love, desire and sexuality, and about the institution of marriage. Focus on discussion and analyses of film sequences in class and on oral presentations. Students will have the opportunity to progress in vocabulary and oral expression. Films studied include works of Truffaut, Godard, Bunuel, Kechiche, Haneke, Breillat and Audiard. Requirements for this course: completion of 210.301, 201.302, or equivalent score on Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.

This course traces the history of Italian cinema from the silent era to the new millennium, highlighting its main trends and genres, and reflecting on the major transformations modern and contemporary Italian society experienced over the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. We shall examine iconic films such as Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mamma Roma, that received international recognition and influenced other national, cinematic productions. We shall also look at the work of less famous, or independent filmmakers who received less critical attention. While this class takes an historical approach, it also includes a theoretical component and introduces students to the specificity of the cinematic language, examining films in relation to the mise-en-scène, frame composition, camera movements, editing, and sound. This class is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Italian I

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Italian I

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman seminar: Eataly: An Exploration of Italian Food Cultures

Italian cuisine is often recognized as one of the finest in the world. This Freshman Seminar will offer an exploration of Italian food cultures past and present. Discussion topics will include the Slow Food Movement, the tension between local and global, food and social justice, and the representation of food in literature, film, and other media. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, and everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Italian I

Course presents a systematic introduction to a variety of complex cultural and historical topics related to present-day Italy, emphasizing intercultural comparisons and interdisciplinarity, and encouraging a personal exploration of such topics. Course adopts a continuous assessment system (no mid-term and no final), and is conducted entirely in Italian. Year course; must complete both semesters for credit. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option. Language Program Director: Alessandro Zannirato

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements I

This is a four-credit course, and Italian Elements II (AS.210.152) must be completed in the Spring to receive credit. The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. All classes are conducted in Italian; oral participation is strongly encouraged from the beginning. Students wishing to retain credits for Italian Elements I must complete Italian Elements II with a passing grade. No Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Burning Books, Burning Ideas. Censorship and Free Speech in the Renaissance

Our online shopping habits and political Facebook posts are being monitored by Google's administration as well as by governments across the globe. If we think this is harmless, it is because we assume that the era of the first Apple Watch is different from the era of the first Gutenberg press. But is this really the case? In this course, we will explore this issue by focusing on the emergence of the first institutionalized censorship during a foundational period of modern times – the Renaissance. After addressing the reasons that motivated the creation of the first Index of Prohibited Books (1559), we will closely examine some of the most controversial works by Renaissance authors who were persecuted and banned for their religious, political, or scientific ideas (Erasmus of Rotterdam, Niccolò Machiavelli, Torquato Tasso, Galileo Galilei). The analysis of these texts will allow us to gain an understanding of both the dynamics of censorship and self-censorship in the Renaissance, and the logic behind power's obsession with cultural control – in those times like nowadays.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Green Literature

This course studies 20th and 21st century Italian literature from an ecological perspective. Focusing on the position of humans and non-humans in both natural and urban environments, and reflecting on how literature can raise environmental consciousness and change perceptions of the earth, we shall read classics and lesser-known literature from a variety of genres like poetry by Salvatore Quasimodo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Andrea Zanzotto, novels by Carlo Levi, Carlo Cassola, and Anna Maria Ortese, as well as children’s books by Dino Buzzati and Italo Calvino. This course is taught in English. Special sessions in Italian will be announced during the semester. Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 02.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Green Literature

This course studies 20th and 21st century Italian literature from an ecological perspective. Focusing on the position of humans and non-humans in both natural and urban environments, and reflecting on how literature can raise environmental consciousness and change perceptions of the earth, we shall read classics and lesser-known literature from a variety of genres like poetry by Salvatore Quasimodo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Andrea Zanzotto, novels by Carlo Levi, Carlo Cassola, and Anna Maria Ortese, as well as children’s books by Dino Buzzati and Italo Calvino. This course is taught in English. Special sessions in Italian will be announced during the semester. Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 02.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.171 (01)Accelerated Italian Elements I for Advanced Spanish SpeakersMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZannirato, AlessandroBloomberg 178
AS.212.344 (01)Topics in French Cinema: Amour, Sexualité, MariageMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoos, SuzanneGilman 313
AS.211.222 (01)Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.210.151 (01)Italian Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroGilman 413
AS.210.251 (01)Intermediate Italian IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffGilman 377
AS.210.251 (02)Intermediate Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaffGilman 413
AS.211.278 (01)Freshman seminar: Eataly: An Exploration of Italian Food CulturesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMProietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, AlessandroHodson 305GRLL-ENGL
AS.210.151 (02)Italian Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroChar Cmns 324
AS.210.351 (01)Advanced Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroGilman 313
AS.210.151 (03)Italian Elements IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMStaff, Zannirato, AlessandroWhitehead 304
AS.214.349 (01)Burning Books, Burning Ideas. Censorship and Free Speech in the RenaissanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMZuliani, Alberto LucaGilman 219GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.214.363 (01)Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Green LiteratureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, Laura, StaffGilman 75GRLL-ENGL
AS.214.363 (02)Italian Journeys: Modern and Contemporary Green LiteratureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 75GRLL-ENGL